How to assemble a winning work look

Embrace a more casually stylish look if your workplace allows it.

Sometimes it takes something extra to stand out from the sea of suits flooding the foyer, the lift or the boardroom.

Whether it’s experimenting with textures or contrasting old-school style with contemporary accents, stepping outside your style comfort zone is a great way to get noticed – in a good way.

Louise Edmonds, the founder and style director of men’s lifestyle portal MenStylePower, believes one of the strongest statements a man can make is with his sense of style

“It’s incredibly important to align your talents, skill set, position and personal brand with your attire,” Edmonds says.

“Within a 20-second time frame you are judged on the way you look and how confident you are in what you’re wearing.

“I’ve always called the boardroom the modern-day battlefield, and knowing what armour and ammunition you bring in is vital.”

Taking the first step towards becoming a fashion savant is the hardest, so with thanks to David Jones we’ve compiled a guide to help you pick out some winning looks of distinction.

Begin with

Common style mistakes men always make

You’ve got to own it. That’s the number one rule in the corporate man’s style book, if he was to have such a thing.

Which, for some, mightn’t be a bad idea because fashion blunders abound in the executive workplace.

One of the biggest occurs when a man isn’t sure what he likes and is swayed by trends that have little to do with his own style. You know the sort of thing – beards on the shorter man; huge checks on the thin man; tattoos.

A great outfit can be brought undone if the shoes are trashed.
A great outfit can be brought undone if the shoes are trashed. Photo: iStock

“Guys who wish to get on in the corporate world will have more success by following their own authentic style and showing their unique personality,” says image consultant Avril Laurie.

“Be different; nobody became famous by following the masses.”

Here, Laurie shares other common blunders to avoid .

Dressing up is not dressing better

The two are not related to looking more stylish; on the

Six men’s fashion trends that defined

<b>2015 in men’s fashion</b><br>
<b>High end underwear</b><br>
While traditionally wives and girlfriends bought underclothes for their male partners, now certain male consumers think nothing of spending up to $470 for unmentionables. True, the Hanes three-pack is unlikely to go the way of the dodo. Yet with nearly $3 billion spent last year on luxury underclothes, guys in sexy boxer briefs are getting all the likes on Instagram.

If 2015 was emphatically the year of the Instagram peacock, it also marked an inflection point in the evolution of men’s style.

Men’s wear stole a market-share march on women’s wear, traditionally the leader in the apparel industry. An embrace of fashion as a sport and a pastime threatened to outstrip fantasy football (and possibly even pornography) as the great obsession

As the pursuit of heritage brands grew whiskers longer than those of a Brooklyn beard farmer, young men shucked the hoodies and raised their style game in countless ways.

 Seventeen year old model Lucky Blue Smith has 1.7 million Instagram followers and leads

When is it OK to wear a bow tie?

When is it OK to wear a bow tie? Depending on your views of fashion, the answer could just as easily be “anytime” as “never”.

Assuming you’re reading this because you answer the former, the art of rocking a bow tie is much more nuanced than tying on a standard necktie, and must be handled more carefully.

A bow tie is such a small piece of clothing that it’s acceptable for it to get loud. You wanted to stand out by wearing one, so embrace it.

First, let’s get to know the different types of bow ties: Self-tied, pre-tied, and clip-on. Ignore types two and three immediately.

If you’re the type of person who wants to wear a bow tie, you should be the type of person that wants to learn how to tie one. There are thousands of videos to choose from but my personal favourite is this one.

The key to wearing a bow tie is to do it sparingly (unless you’re trying to make it your “thing”). Make it about a special event, and keep the rest of your outfit muted — think a solid colour suit and shirt.

For a suit, go with navy, black or grey; for shirts, stick to blues

Ten dogs that are a man’s best friend

This story was first published on d’marge.com

There is no greater accessory than an adorable pooch by your side. Try all you want to make a case for a chic tie, a killer watch, or a unique piece of jewellery – nothing will make you look better, and more attractive to the ladies, than a dog. These are our picks for the 10 coolest dog breeds, and if you’re in the market for a pup of your own, please also consider adopting your new best friend from The Lost Dogs Home or the RSPCA.

 

1. Miniature Dachshund

OK, so something called a weiner dog probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when you think “cool,” but the Miniature Dachshund is cooler than meets the eye. The standard size was bred to scent, chase, and flush out burrow-dwelling animals such as badgers, while the Miniature was developed to hunt smaller prey such as rabbits. Some experts even believe that the Dachshund goes back to ancient Egypt, where similar dogs were featured in engravings and mummified in burial urns. Notable Dachshund owners include Andy Warhol and E.B. White.

 

2. French Bulldog

Frenchie fans are a fierce bunch. Few breeds inspire loyalty like the French

Sock and awe

Many men only think about socks when rummaging through the laundry basket, or searching for the other one; however, a well-dressed chap always chooses his socks with regard to more than simply finding a clean or matching pair.

Despite their lowly status – figuratively and literally – on the sartorial scale, a pair of humble socks can instantly grab attention and radically alter first impressions of their wearer. Witness the man sitting opposite you on the train; the rest of his outfit might not look the most inspired, but those bright yellow socks prompt you to reassess and wonder if he’s pondering more substantial issues than the woeful life of his smartphone battery.

Additionally, the sight of a politician sporting a big, bright pair might just make you stop and think that the talking head on the television doesn’t tell the whole story. Dennis Ebeli, the man behind the Alfredo Gonzales sock brand. Photo: Jason South

If you live in Melbourne and pass by the Town Hall on a regular basis, such a man might just be Robert Doyle, who in his second term as Melbourne’s Lord Mayor has taken to colourful socks like cyclists do to Swanston Street.

But it turns out the

The case for a briefcase

I recently had the pleasure of a two-week sojourn back to Mother England where I was able to stay in the heart of London. Whilst there, amidst visiting family, drinking my body weight in warm beer and convincing everyone that only people who had never been to Australia actually drank Fosters, I noticed the accessory du jour among the men of London was the faithful briefcase.

Not too long ago I wrote an article that suggested getting rid of the backpack and the satchel in favour of a briefcase. I didn’t really extrapolate on my reasons why. So, after seeing them in action en masse, I thought I’d briefly revisit that statement.

The whole idea of a briefcase, for many of us, might summon images of the battered, square, bulky box of the travelling salesmen. Or maybe even those faded shots of your dad sporting some serious muttonchops, brown flares and a wide-as-hell tie during the 60s and 70s.

Thankfully, however, things have changed slightly and the modern-day briefcase is now a sleek piece of craftsmanship that can add serious style to your office attire. Brands such as Dunhill, Jack Spade, Z Zegna, Mandarina Duck and even local leather labels such as Hunt

The rise of men’s accessories

A plain square of cloth flags a quiet revolution in men’s fashion in Australia.

It’s not about the clothes any more – it’s about the pocket square slipped into the jacket, the coloured socks or tie, the bag slung over the shoulder to cart the laptop.

Accessories are taking centre stage. The average man on the street has twigged to what women have known for years and what the fashion industry is loath to tout: accessories are a versatile, affordable luxury.

Accessories maketh the man’s outfit.

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“Our accessory business has grown three-fold in the last five years,” says Anton Rodguis, floor manager of the Henry Bucks flagship store in Collins Street, Melbourne.

“Accessories are a great way to change the look for outfitting men, without the huge expense of high price-ticket clothing.  The younger customer is very savvy about buying smart new accessories to complement their outfits

“Women sometimes buy them (for men). But generally it is the younger customer who is aware of these great looks.”

Cheap and easy

And accessories can not only be ‘affordable’ but downright bargain priced. A $20 pocket square, in soft chambray or simple white cotton, is being worn in the jacket pocket of the “cool, casual

The man-scarf a stylish winter essential

One physiological side-effect of being a) fairly hirsute and b) of Irish descent is that I very rarely feel the cold. Come mid-winter I’m still walking around in shorts and maybe a long sleeve shirt or, at worst, a jumper to give my Celtic pelt an extra boost.

But on days that are particularly brusque I’ve found that throwing on a scarf lends a little extra warmth without the frustrating overheating that can often come with winter coats, particularly when it comes to fickle Australian weather patterns (Melbourne, I’m looking at you).

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 The man-scarf: style and practicality in one neat package. Photo: M.J. Bale

For most men, scarfs have traditionally tended to come in two guises – as an acrylic and mostly-garish statement of support for a beloved sporting team, or the annual Christmas foisting of a scratchy cable-knit piece by your least favourite nanna.

Either way, these dodgy excuses for neckwear do much to discredit the humble scarf’s proper place in a man’s arsenal of winter style. It’s time they returned to their rightful place as a sophisticated gentleman’s accessory, rather than as a beer-and sauce-stained testament to club allegiance.

Aside from the

The man-scarf: a stylish winter essential

One physiological side-effect of being a) fairly hirsute and b) of Irish descent is that I very rarely feel the cold. Come mid-winter I’m still walking around in shorts and maybe a long sleeve shirt or, at worst, a jumper to give my Celtic pelt an extra boost.

But on days that are particularly brusque I’ve found that throwing on a scarf lends a little extra warmth without the frustrating overheating that can often come with winter coats, particularly when it comes to fickle Australian weather patterns (Melbourne, I’m looking at you).

  • Find more stories on men’s style
 The man-scarf: style and practicality in one neat package. Photo: M.J. Bale

For most men, scarfs have traditionally tended to come in two guises – as an acrylic and mostly-garish statement of support for a beloved sporting team, or the annual Christmas foisting of a scratchy cable-knit piece by your least favourite nanna.

Either way, these dodgy excuses for neckwear do much to discredit the humble scarf’s proper place in a man’s arsenal of winter style. It’s time they returned to their rightful place as a sophisticated gentleman’s accessory, rather than as a beer-and sauce-stained testament to club allegiance.

Aside from the

Are ties still relevant?

A statement of sartorial individuality or corporate conformity? Whatever your individual take, it’s a fact is that fewer and fewer men are wearing ties to work.

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When I dress that way, I feel like I have to act that way – you dress professionally, you act professionally.

That’s not to say the tie’s hold as a sartorial staple is under threat. If anything, its rapid retirement from office duties is being celebrated – not by your average 9-to-5 worker, but by fashionable young men determined to return it to its dandyish roots.

“Any styling that I’m seeing globally incorporates the tie,” says Godwin Hili, founder and creative director of Melbourne-based men’s label Godwin Charli.

“Definitely the sartorial man is styling all aspects of his look. If he’s not wearing a tie he’s at least got a pocket ‘chief in his top pocket.”

And if young sartorialists are toasting the increased absence of novelty and downright offensive ties from the workplace, they should spare a thought for those who stereotypically have no style whatsoever: tech geeks.

The geek rebellion

Nat Thomas, the chief operating officer of job-listing website Adzuna Australia, believes it is no coincidence that the demise of more formal workwear styles

Picking a hat to suit your personal style

Dozing off isn’t a good idea, particularly when you’re sitting in a barber’s chair and not paying much attention.

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As I leave, virtually bald, the first thing I reach for is a hat. A woollen felt hat by Christys’ London and purchased in Liberty department store, my hat covers up the ‘damage’, at least for the moment. But summer is around the corner, and I won’t be able to keep the felt on for too much longer.

 A diverse array of styles from Cose Ipanema. 

Hats are a peculiar fashion accessory. You can feel literally bald without one, and often conspicuous wearing one. Some retailers tell you that your face is made for wearing hats, even if you’re fully aware that this couldn’t be further from the truth.

With my hat firmly planted but still feeling extremely conscious about my skull, I head into Smart Alec hatters, a boutique store in Melbourne’s Fitzroy that specialises in men’s hats. Owner and designer Michael Albert has a sharp eye.

“You’re wearing a Christys’. You can tell by the unique felt. It’s a little softer than the ones we use,” he says. That raises my confidence and

A man’s guide to wearing shoes without socks

This story was originally published on D’Marge.

Your girlfriend/wife has it easy. Summer comes around and all she has to do to accommodate the rising mercury is throw on a dress and slip into some sandals.

For you, though, summer brings annual footwear frustrations over how to stay stylish but also stay cool. Sandals look faintly ridiculous on all but the most sartorially advanced men. Thongs are too adolescent for your grown-up tastes. Peep-toe pumps are definitely out of the question. So what do you do?

Liberation is the answer. The kind of liberation that exposes your ankles and calves to the elements and lets them enjoy the seasonal sun alongside the rest of you. More and more men are going sockless for summer; but do it without taking precautions and not only will you look foolish, you’ll likely have a biohazard on your hands.

Here are a few pointers to keep in mind before you decide to rock the no-socks look.

Suitable occasions

The classic sockless look comes with an occasion already built in: boat shoes on the deck of your spectacular Wolf of Wall Street yacht. If you’re not there yet, don’t worry –

Seven habits of incredibly stylish men

The stylish man knows his sizing limitations. Models are sample size so only models can buy straight off the rack and walk out of a store looking like a million bucks.

To overcome the problem of long legs on trousers and sleeves that cover your hands, see someone with the gift of scissors, needle and thread – an alterations specialist. Nowadays it’s super affordable (and a lot cheaper than having your own suit custom-made) and easy; when you buy new work pants, take the trousers straight to your fix-it person.

Put on some weight? Get the trousers let out to avoid looking like a squashed sausage. No matter how much you spend or how beautiful the fabric, there’s no faking it when it comes to fit. Jackets that sag and baggy pants that slump look careless and stop you looking like the stylish gent you want to be.

2) Well-maintained shoes matter

It’s all about the shoes (and the suit and jeans and pressed shirt, but that’s another story). Shoes are the first thing to be noticed when you meet someone for the first time. Rocking up to work in the latest Hugo Boss mohair wool three-piece suit is killer. But wearing derby shoes

What to wear for dinner, drinks … and dealmaking

Deals aren’t always sealed in the boardroom or during office hours. Client dinners, work drinks and weekend events are par for the course in business.

You’ll need to ditch the corporate suit of armour after 5pm and project a stronger sense of your personal style. It’s the perfect opportunity to be a little more adventurous with your wardrobe, says David Jones’ men’s career and luxury clothing buyer Glenn Elliott.

“Ensuring that you are meeting the dress requirement, create a look that says relaxed and out to have fun,” Elliott says. “Lose the tie, add a pocket square or keep the tie but change to a bolder statement colour, replace the suit jacket with a soft blazer.”

Take your cue from the latest release in menswear ahead of spring, and make sure your look is always on point, even when you’re off the clock.

Fit and fitted

While office dress codes tend to favour more traditional fits, social scenarios give you the chance to take a risk or two with the cut of your garb.

Slim-fitting suits offer a leaner silhouette, and add a touch of sharpness that’s perfect for an evening on the town.

Choose a minimalist

Ten suits that spell career success

When all it takes is one-tenth of a second to form an opinion, the importance of creating a professional first impression can’t be understated.

Whether meeting with a client, presenting to a room or nailing an interview, appearance is a critical filter. Visual cues – from the cut and fit of your attire to the condition of your shoes – become make-or-break details.

When it comes to making sartorial statements that will have a lasting impact, the suit is the sharpest one a man can make.

The moment you put on a perfectly fitting suit – whatever the occasion – there is a noticeable shift in the way you present yourself. Your posture improves, which in turn helps make you appear more confident. The garment’s rich history and refinement adds a subtle sense of authority.

The staff at David Jones understand the impact that a great suit can have. “There is a fine art to suiting. A precision cut, smart fabrication and sharp finishes show an acute attention to detail and can set you apart in the workplace,” a spokesperson tells Executive Style.

“First impressions count. Make a strong one with colours, prints and styling that reflect your personality.”

With men embracing the nuances of fashion more than ever,

How to assemble a winning work look

Embrace a more casually stylish look if your workplace allows it.

Sometimes it takes something extra to stand out from the sea of suits flooding the foyer, the lift or the boardroom.

Whether it’s experimenting with textures or contrasting old-school style with contemporary accents, stepping outside your style comfort zone is a great way to get noticed – in a good way.

Louise Edmonds, the founder and style director of men’s lifestyle portal MenStylePower, believes one of the strongest statements a man can make is with his sense of style.

 Embrace a more casually stylish look if your workplace allows it. Photo: Scott Ehler

“It’s incredibly important to align your talents, skill set, position and personal brand with your attire,” Edmonds says.

“Within a 20-second time frame you are judged on the way you look and how confident you are in what you’re wearing.

“I’ve always called the boardroom the modern-day battlefield, and knowing what armour and ammunition you bring in is vital.”

Taking the first step towards becoming a fashion savant is the hardest, so with

Seven habits of incredibly stylish men

 

Here are seven habits of the incredibly stylish gent worth noting now. Pen and paper, ready?

1) Know a good tailoThe stylish man knows his sizing limitations. Models are sample size so only models can buy straight off the rack and walk out of a store looking like a million bucks.

To overcome the problem of long legs on trousers and sleeves that cover your hands, see someone with the gift of scissors, needle and thread – an alterations specialist. Nowadays it’s super affordable (and a lot cheaper than having your own suit custom-made) and easy; when you buy new work pants, take the trousers straight to your fix-it person.

Put on some weight? Get the trousers let out to avoid looking like a squashed sausage. No matter how much you spend or how beautiful the fabric, there’s no faking it when it comes to fit. Jackets that sag and baggy pants that slump look careless and stop you looking like the stylish gent you want to be.

2) Well-maintained shoes matter

It’s all about the shoes (and the suit and jeans and pressed shirt, but that’s another story). Shoes are the first thing to be noticed when you meet someone for the first

25 of the best men’s suits

Men’s suits can be traced back to the 17th century, when King Charles II imposed his power through a strict dress code in the courts. Edwardians developed the lounge suit in the 1900s, preceding 1920s Gatsby gents who went elaborately Dandy with wide-legged trousers, pastels and statement checks.

The ’40s saw pant waists rise and smoking jackets slink in, before WWII dispelled all sense of luxury, as clothing rations lent their utilitarian effect to suits in the ’50s.

But it was the ’60s that saw today’s modern suit emerge: those Italian maestros of needle and thread who saw the importance of tailoring a flawlessly fitting suit for men.

Suits are an investment piece, and warrant much planning when buying off the rack. The most important quality is a jacket that has a full canvas. A canvassed jacket has layers of material (wool, horsehair or camel) that sit between the outer fabric and the inner lining of a suit jacket. The style holds its shape after multiple wears and drapes against the body.

The second option is a half-canvas, where the tailor canvasses in the more visible top portion of the jacket for superior

Best men’s hairstyles for summer

With summer on our doorstep, many men are thinking about a trip to the barbers for a trim and a tidy.

The swelling temperatures  mean longer hairstyles are banished for clipped locks.

“A traditional summer style for guys is very short,” says men’s barber Jimmy Rod. “A lot of guys want easy, low maintenance, easy-to-style hair. The high faded, short around the sides look.”

Rod runs nine barber salons around Australia, and says changing seasons mean changing styles for many sartorially switched on gents.

Rock the look

“Coming into summer … you’ll see the shorter sort of side parts, shorter brush backs, shorter textured sort of looks,” he says.

The key, Rod explains, is to know what works for your face shape and to get advice from your barber on how to rock that look.

“A lot of guys won’t put the effort into styling their hair. You really need to get instructions from your barber on how to do it, so always ask your barber.”

Rough and ready

As for his own routine, Rod says it’s relatively hassle free. “All I do is use boost powder and put